An open-source time-series database optimized for fast ingest and complex queries.
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111.3 MB
3 months ago
59.3M
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Last update
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Readme

An open-source time-series database optimized for fast ingest and complex queries. Engineered up from PostgreSQL, packaged as an extension.

Please note: there is no latest tag for this image. See below for further explanation.

Notable tags

  • latest-pg14 - The latest release based on PostgreSQL 14
  • latest-pg13 - The latest release based on PostgreSQL 13
  • latest-pg12 - The latest release based on PostgreSQL 12
  • latest-pg11 - The latest release based on PostgreSQL 11
  • latest-pg10 - The latest release based on PostgreSQL 10 (support for PostgreSQL 10 is deprecated and no new releases are planned)
  • latest-pg9.6 - The latest release based on PostgreSQL 9.6 (support for PostgreSQL 9.6 is deprecated and no new releases are planned)
  • Each release will also have those corresponding tags, e.g., 1.7.0-pg12, 1.7.0-pg11, 1.7.0-pg10, and 1.7.0-pg9.6

Notable links

Why is there no latest tag?

In general, it is usually a bad idea to track the latest tag for any Docker image, since you may get unexpectedly upgraded. For TimescaleDB, this is particularly problematic because not only can the version of TimescaleDB change, but also the version of PostgreSQL. If we wanted our latest tag to always be the latest of all dependencies, users could be updated between major versions of PostgreSQL, which requires a pg_upgrade step. That may cause more hassles for the operator than expected.

For these reasons, we do not offer a latest tag, but we do offer a 'latest' equivalent by publishing a latest tag for each PostgreSQL platform we support. For production systems, you should still be explicit about the version you want to use and not these latest tags, but at least you won't have to run a pg_upgrade step unexpectedly.